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5 players who regret leaving Liverpool amid Sadio Mane and Takumi Minamino struggles

Sadio , Takumi Minamino and Divock Origi are amongst those who recently left and have discovered there are plenty of challenges away from Anfield.

Liverpool’s recent illustrious chapter that has included both Premier League and Champions League titles means very few players wish to leave Anfield in a hurry.

However, there are the odd few who perhaps grow tired of Jurgen Klopp’s demands or simply seek a new challenge elsewhere – though rarely does it ever work out for them. The Reds boss has helped transform Liverpool’s fortunes since his appointment in late 2015 and overseen some stellar pieces of business.

Aided by former sporting director Michael Edwards, Liverpool have earned a reputation as being one of the shrewdest clubs around due to the unknown gems they have unearthed and the money they have recouped on players many would have struggled to get half the fee for.

It sparks questions over why anyone would wish to leave Liverpool full stop, but Mirror Football has highlighted some that have and how they have fared since their Anfield exit.

Sadio Mane has come in for some criticism for his performances at Bayern Munich.

The international will always be adored on the red half of Merseyside for his vital efforts during the most successful chapter of the club’s recent history.

Sadio Mane on rivalry with Mohamed Salah. Sadio Mane reveals the truth behind his relationship with former team-mate Mo Salah.

Last summer saw Mane bid farewell to the Liverpool faithful as he upped sticks to Bayern Munich for a new challenge that sees his become the main man for one of European football’s biggest outfits.

It hasn’t entirely gone to plan, as Mane has a respectable if not exactly amazing three goals in seven appearances for the reigning Bundesliga champions who have suffered a slow start to the season.

Takumi Minamino

Minamino always struggled to nail-down a regular place in the Liverpool side and established himself as somewhat of a Carabao Cup specialist – deployed when Klopp woud give more ‘important’ players a rest, saving them for bigger games.

Well it looks as if a different type of struggle has followed the Japan international to Monaco after signing for the Ligue 1 outfit last summer.

Minamino has either started from the bench or withdrawn from action early on in the overwhelming majority of his Monaco appearances to date. He did enjoy netting his first goal for his new side last weekend, bagging the second in a 3-0 win over Reims.

It is a damning indictment of how surplus to requirements Minamino was for the biggest games at Liverpool that his first and as of yet only goal for Monaco was just his seventh league goal in two-and-a-half years.

Despite the Ligue 1 campaign only being eight games old, French publication Quotidien Du Sport have already declared Minamino as the flop of the season as a result of his slow start.

Divock Origi

The Belgian will always be a cult hero on the Anfield terraces for his ability to pop up with a goal at the most important times, whether that be a Champions League final or a Merseyside derby.

His status at new side AC Milan isn’t quite as strong, with persistent injuries meaning his time on the pitch has been limited and as a result Origi has made just four appearances for the Italian giants.

All four of those outings have come from Origi being introduced off the bench, the striker playing a combined 81 minutes for the Rossoneri this term.

In that time, the former Reds forward has failed to score a single goal or deliver the kind of performance that would have first-choice option Olivier Giroud fearing for his place any time soon.

Reports have already started to circulate that Milan are planning to sign a replacement for Origi as soon as the January transfer window.

Philippe Coutinho

At one stage, the Brazilian international was widely regarded as Liverpool’s go-to man. However, the £142million sale of Coutinho actually helped kickstart all of Liverpool’s recent success and as a result altered the midfielder’s Anfield legacy.

He initially swapped Merseyside for Catalonia in January 2018 but failed to live up to the lofty expectations that greeted his arrival at and was soon labelled a flop but many sections of the Spanish media.

Despite paying one of the highest transfer fees in football history for Coutinho, Barcelona permitted his loan departure to Bayern Munich after just a season and a half in the blue and red shirt of the Blaugrana.

He returned to Barcelona the following campaign but still failed to inspire any kind of form and was sent on another loan spell, this time to Aston Villa for the second half of the 2021/22 season.

That loan turned to a permanent switch to Villa Park last summer for a fee of reported to be £20m. The switch marked Barcelona’s £120m loss, while Coutinho’s fast start at Villa initially raised hopes but his form has since returned to the kind of depths it reached at the Camp Nou.

Emre Can

The German international joined Liverpool as a 20-year-old and proved to be a vital addition to the Reds due to his ability to be deployed in a number of different positions.

Can’s preferred role is as a defensive midfielder, but he has shown countless times he can operate as part of a backline – whether that be as a centre-back or even at right-back on occasion.

After a bright start, Can’s Liverpool career slowly fizzled out to the point where he was allowed to leave for nothing at the end of his contract and join Italian giants Juventus in the summer of 2018.

Upon his arival in Turin, Can declared he left Liverpool “to win titles”, a remark that came back to haunt him when at the end of that same season his fomer side went the distance in the Champions League.

He lasted a season and a half before returning to the Bundesliga, donning the famous yellow and black of Borussia Dortmund. Can initially arrived at the Signal Iduna Park on loan, before making the move permanent a month later.

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